Source: Momentaufnahmen

Dear readers,

as I understood one is free to copy material to one’s website or blog but it is prohibited to put it in print. In case you have objections concerning some of your text and photos that I found on the internet and published on my blog, please let me know and we can discuss this matter. I can always remove it from my blog.

My blog is only meant as a portal to websites or interesting articles on tropical landsnails and slugs.

Always feel free to contact me

fvanderwart59@gmail.com

Tropical Land Snail Diversity: South and Southeast Asia

South and Southeast Asia

 

All credits go to: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/research/projects/tropical-land-snails/southasia.dsml

Our current Darwin Initiative projects build on the approach of our Sri Lankan work and, with project partners, extend our activities into India, Nepal, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam and Malaysia. These projects are survey based and seek to achieve common objectives by:

  • international cooperation in regional malacology
  • establishment/enhancement of reference collections
  • development of databases
  • publication of illustrated species lists
  • publication of popular guides
  • engaging in and publication of joint research
  • identifying conservation priorities
  • developing conservation strategies

Thailand

Our project partner in Thailand is Somsak Panha, who leads the Mollusca Research Group in the Department of Biology, Faculty of Science Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok. Somsak heads a dynamic team of researchers that has been active on many aspects of land snail research since 1988. They are the regional centre of expertise and resources for our programme and directly responsible for running the projects in Laos, Vietnam and Malaysia. Thailand has a diverse snail fauna with a particularly rich component associated with the extensive ranges of limestone hills and outcrops, including many micro-snails. Thailand also has the advantage of occupying a key zoogeographical position with a snail fauna ranging from Indo-Himalayan to the north and west to Malaysian in the south and Indo-Chinese to the east.

India

In India we are working with N.A. Aravind at the Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment. A century ago the study of South Asian land snails was at the forefront of investigations into tropical land snail faunas, reaching a peak with publication of the three Mollusca volumes in the Fauna of British India series. Because of Britain’s long association with the region and the pioneering work of British malacologists, see:Naggs, F. 1997. William Benson and the early study of land snails in British India and Ceylon. Archives of Natural History 24: 37-88. PDF (47MB), the NHM has the best regional land snail research resources available anywhere. These consist of specimen reference collections, rich in types, and regional literature.

Indrella ampulla (Benson)

Photos N.A. Aravind.
Indrella ampulla (Benson) is a monotypic Ariophantid genus endemic to wet forests in the Western Ghats, India. The shell is delicate being mostly protinaceous with a relatively low calcium carbonate content; the body exhibits dymantic colour polymorphism..

The rich snail fauna of the range of hills extending down the western margins of peninsular India is a component of the Western Ghats Global Biodiversity Hotspot and is the focus of our project.

Prem Budha in Langtang National Park, Nepal.

Prem Budha in Langtang National Park, Nepal.

Nepal

Nepal was largely closed to outsiders until the latter half of the twentieth century, was excluded from the malacological investigations that flourished in nineteenth century India and the snail fauna remains poorly known to this day. We are working with Prem Budha, Chairman of the Centre for Biological Conservation, Nepal, and Thierry Backeljau, University of Antwerp, Belgium, in seeking to redress this situation. Nepal is part of the Himalayan Biodiversity Hotspot and this is expected to be reflected in a diverse snail fauna. In addition there are forested limestone hills surrounding the Kathmandu Valley that we expect to have high densities of snails and possess a significant proportion of endemic species.

Sri Lanka

Many forests in Sri Lanka have yet to be surveyed for land snails but surveys carried out to date show a clear picture of the pattern of snail distributions and conservation issues that need to be addressed. Our main focus is the loss and fragmentation of forests, particularly in Sri Lanka’s wet zone, and the role of transformed habitats as partial reservoirs of Sri Lanka’s biota.

Conserving the remaining forest fragments will not be sufficient to conserve Sri Lanka’s remaining species. Whether driven by human activity or natural processes, climate change is an inevitable feature of the earth’s past and future. Set in islands of transformed habitats, forest biotas will not be able to shift and accommodate to climate change as they have in the past and establishing forest corridors is a key stategy for conservation. Working with Rohan Pethiyagoda and Kelum Manamendra-Arachchi at the Agrapatana Arboretum we are carrying out a base line study of snails for this cloud forest restoration project. We are also looking at the mosaic of transformed habitats to assess the extent to which they can act as reservoirs of native snail taxa. Of most importance are the traditionally cultivated home gardens, which are in themselves threatened by changing land use.

 

I am fully aware that all the links from the above website are working but I give you the Publications part as well, just for your convenience. Friedrich

 

Tropical Land Snail Diversity: Publications

Euplecta travancorica

Members of the family Ariophantidae exhibit tail appendages. The typical form of Euplecta travancorica comes from India and this Sri lankan example may be a distinct species.

Project publications

Download publication images

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Selected publications

Sutcharit, C., Naggs, F., Wade, C.M., Fontanilla, I., and Panha, S. 2010.The new family Diapheridae, a new species of Diaphera Albers from Thailand, and the position of the Diapheridae within a molecular phylogeny of the Streptaxoidea (Pulmonata: Stylommatophora). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 160: 1-16. For reprints of this paper contact F. Naggs.

Kongim, B., Sutcharit, C., Tongkerd, P., Tan, S-H. A., Quyn, N.X., Naggs, F., and Panha, S. 2010. Karyotype variations in the Genus Pollicaria (Caenogastropoda: Pupinidae). Zoological Studies 49: 125-131. For reprints of this paper contact F. Naggs.

Sutcharit, C., Naggs, F., Panha, S. 2010. A first record of the family Cerastidae in Thailand, with a description of a new species (Pulmonata: Orthurethra: Cerastidae). The Raffles Bulletin of Zoology 58: 251-258. 
Published online at: http://rmbr.nus.edu.sg/rbz/biblio/58/58rbz251-258.pdf

Pokryszkoi, B.M., Auffenberg, K., Hlavác, J.C. and Naggs, F. 2010. Pupilloidea of Pakistan (Gastropoda: Pulmonata): Truncatellininae, Vertigininae, Gastrocoptinae, Pupillinae (in part). Annales Zoologici 59: 423-458. For reprints of this paper contact F. Naggs.

Raheem, D.C., Naggs, F., Chimonides, P.D.J., Preece, R.C. and Eggleton, P. (2009). Fragmentation and pre-existing species turnover determine land-snail assemblages of tropical rain forest. Journal of Biogeography36: 1923-1938. For reprints of this paper contact D. Raheem.

Raheem, D.C., Naggs F., Preece, R.C., Mapatuna, Y., Kariyawasam, L.,. and Eggleton, P. 2008. Structure and conservation of Sri Lankan land-snail assemblages in fragmented lowland rainforest and village home gardens. Journal of applied Ecology 45: 1019-1028. For reprints of this paper contact D. Raheem.

Budha, P.B., and Naggs F. 2008. The Giant African Land Snail Lissachatina fulica (Bowdich) in Nepal. The Malacologist 50: 19-21. [ View as PDF ]

Raheem, D. 2008. Persistence and conservation of Sri Lankan rainforest snails in a landscape of fragmented forest and modified habitats. The Malacologist 50: 26-27. [ View as PDF ]

Naggs, F., Raheem, D and Budha, P. 2008. The carnivorous slug Testacella in Cambridgeshire. Nature in Cambridgeshire 50: 48-51. For copies of this paper contact F. Naggs.

Sutcharit, C., Naggs, F. and Panha, S. 2007. Systematic review of the land snail genus Neocepolis Pilsbry, 1891 (Pulmonata: Camaenidae) from North Vietnam. Journal of Natural History 41: 619-631. For reprints of this paper contact F. Naggs.

Wade, C.M.,, Hudelot, C., Davison, A., Naggs, F. and Mordan, P.B. 2007. Molecular phylogeny of the helicoid land snails (Pulmonata: Stylommatophora: Helicoidea), with special emphasis on the Camaenidae. Journal of Molluscan Studies 73: 411-415. For reprints of this paper contact F. Naggs.

Tumpeesuwan, C. Naggs, F. and Panha, S. 2007. A new genus and new species of Dyakiid snail (Pulmonata: Dyakiidae) from the Phu Phan Range, Northeastern Thailand. The Raffles Bulletin of Zoology 55: 363-369. For reprints of this paper contact F. Naggs.

Naggs, F., Panha, S., and Raheem, D. 2006. Developing land snail expertise in South and Southeast Asia, a new Darwin Initiative project. The Natural History Journal of Chulalongkorn University 6: 43-46. [ View as PDF ]

Wade, C.M., Mordan, P.B., and Naggs, F. 2006. Evolutionary relationships among the Pulmonata land snails and slugs (Pulmonata, Stylommatophora). Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 87: 593-610. For information on obtaining copies of this paper contact F. Naggs.

Kongim, B. Naggs, F. and Panha, S. 2006. Karyotypes of operculate land snails of the genus Cyclophorus (Prosobranchia; Cyclophoridae) in Thailand. Invertebrate Reproduction and Development 49: 1-8. For information on obtaining copies of this paper please contact F. Naggs.

Raheem, D. & Naggs, F. 2006. The Sri Lankan endemic semi-slug Ratnadvipia (Limacoidea: Ariophantidae) and a new species from Southwestern Sri Lanka. Systematics and Biodiversity 4(1): 99-126. [ View as PDF(2MB) ]

Naggs, F. & Raheem, D. 2005. Sri Lankan snail diversity: faunal origins and future prospects. Records of the Western Australia Museum Supplement No. 68: 11-29 [ View as PDF (26MB) ]

Naggs, F., Raheem, D. & Platts, E. 2005. Some observations on Sri Lankan land snails including the impact of the Indian Ocean tsunami on lowland snail faunas and its importance as a major fossilisation event. The Malacologist 45: 1, 3-7. 
Published online at: http://www.malacsoc.org.uk/The_Malacologist/BULL45/tsunami.htm 
and http://www.malacsoc.org.uk/The_Malacologist/BULL45/deccanplate.htm

Naggs, F. Raheem, D. Ranawana, K. and Mapatuna, Y. 2005. The Darwin Initiative project on Sri Lankan land snails: patterns of diversity in Sri Lankan forests. The Raffles Bulletin of Zoology Supplement No. 12: 23-29.
Published online at: http://rmbr.nus.edu.sg/rbz/biblio/s12/s12rbz023-029.pdf

Naggs, F. (2004). Lack of information allows invasion of slug and snail pests in Sri Lanka. Case study 30 in Davies, H, King, N and Smith, R. (eds) Taxonomy: targeting invasives. BioNET-INTERNATIONAL. 
Published online at: www.bionet-intl.org/case_studies.

Naggs, F. Raheem, D, Mordan, P. Grimm, B. Ranawana, K. & Kumburegama, S. 2003. Ancient relicts and contemporary exotics: faunal change and survivorship in Sri Lanka’s snail fauna. Slugs & snails. agricultural, veterinary & environmental perspectives. British Crop Protection Council Symposium Proceedings no. 80: 103-108. [ View as PDF ]

Mordan, P. Naggs, F. Ranawana, K. Kumburegama, S. & Grimm, B. 2003. A guide to the pest and exotic gastropods of Sri Lanka. A ten-page folded guide. Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum.

Naggs, F & Raheem D. 2002. Sri Lankan snails. An 8-page folded guide. Department of Zoology, The Natural History Museum.

Naggs, F. & Raheem, D. 2000. Land snail diversity in Sri Lanka. The Natural History Museum, London. 214 pp. ISBN 0565091514. Compact Disc. ISBN 0565091565.

Naggs, F. 1997. William Benson and the early study of land snails in British India and Ceylon. Archives of Natural History 24: 37-88. [ View as PDF (47MB) ]
Published by The Society for the History of Natural History

Naggs, F. 1996. A coloured guide to the land and freshwater Mollusca of Sri Lanka. The Natural History Museum.

 

As you can see you are free to download the provided pdf files to add to your collection! Friedrich

Tropical Land Snail Diversity: South and Southeast Asia

South and Southeast Asia

 

All credits go to: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/research/projects/tropical-land-snails/southasia.dsml

Our current Darwin Initiative projects build on the approach of our Sri Lankan work and, with project partners, extend our activities into India, Nepal, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam and Malaysia. These projects are survey based and seek to achieve common objectives by:

  • international cooperation in regional malacology
  • establishment/enhancement of reference collections
  • development of databases
  • publication of illustrated species lists
  • publication of popular guides
  • engaging in and publication of joint research
  • identifying conservation priorities
  • developing conservation strategies

Thailand

Our project partner in Thailand is Somsak Panha, who leads the Mollusca Research Group in the Department of Biology, Faculty of Science Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok. Somsak heads a dynamic team of researchers that has been active on many aspects of land snail research since 1988. They are the regional centre of expertise and resources for our programme and directly responsible for running the projects in Laos, Vietnam and Malaysia. Thailand has a diverse snail fauna with a particularly rich component associated with the extensive ranges of limestone hills and outcrops, including many micro-snails. Thailand also has the advantage of occupying a key zoogeographical position with a snail fauna ranging from Indo-Himalayan to the north and west to Malaysian in the south and Indo-Chinese to the east.

India

In India we are working with N.A. Aravind at the Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment. A century ago the study of South Asian land snails was at the forefront of investigations into tropical land snail faunas, reaching a peak with publication of the three Mollusca volumes in the Fauna of British India series. Because of Britain’s long association with the region and the pioneering work of British malacologists, see:Naggs, F. 1997. William Benson and the early study of land snails in British India and Ceylon. Archives of Natural History 24: 37-88. PDF (47MB), the NHM has the best regional land snail research resources available anywhere. These consist of specimen reference collections, rich in types, and regional literature.

Indrella ampulla (Benson)

Photos N.A. Aravind.
Indrella ampulla (Benson) is a monotypic Ariophantid genus endemic to wet forests in the Western Ghats, India. The shell is delicate being mostly protinaceous with a relatively low calcium carbonate content; the body exhibits dymantic colour polymorphism..

The rich snail fauna of the range of hills extending down the western margins of peninsular India is a component of the Western Ghats Global Biodiversity Hotspot and is the focus of our project.

Prem Budha in Langtang National Park, Nepal.

Prem Budha in Langtang National Park, Nepal.

Nepal

Nepal was largely closed to outsiders until the latter half of the twentieth century, was excluded from the malacological investigations that flourished in nineteenth century India and the snail fauna remains poorly known to this day. We are working with Prem Budha, Chairman of the Centre for Biological Conservation, Nepal, and Thierry Backeljau, University of Antwerp, Belgium, in seeking to redress this situation. Nepal is part of the Himalayan Biodiversity Hotspot and this is expected to be reflected in a diverse snail fauna. In addition there are forested limestone hills surrounding the Kathmandu Valley that we expect to have high densities of snails and possess a significant proportion of endemic species.

Sri Lanka

Many forests in Sri Lanka have yet to be surveyed for land snails but surveys carried out to date show a clear picture of the pattern of snail distributions and conservation issues that need to be addressed. Our main focus is the loss and fragmentation of forests, particularly in Sri Lanka’s wet zone, and the role of transformed habitats as partial reservoirs of Sri Lanka’s biota.

Conserving the remaining forest fragments will not be sufficient to conserve Sri Lanka’s remaining species. Whether driven by human activity or natural processes, climate change is an inevitable feature of the earth’s past and future. Set in islands of transformed habitats, forest biotas will not be able to shift and accommodate to climate change as they have in the past and establishing forest corridors is a key stategy for conservation. Working with Rohan Pethiyagoda and Kelum Manamendra-Arachchi at the Agrapatana Arboretum we are carrying out a base line study of snails for this cloud forest restoration project. We are also looking at the mosaic of transformed habitats to assess the extent to which they can act as reservoirs of native snail taxa. Of most importance are the traditionally cultivated home gardens, which are in themselves threatened by changing land use.

Dear Sir/Madam,

If you are willing to send me copies of your papers for my Malacology library feel free to send an email to fvanderwart59@gmail.com and you will get my address. Through my blog I will thank you and with your permission I may refer to some interesting matters published in your papers.

I am especially interested in papers on tropical landsnails and slugs.

http://www.parcocurone.it/ambiente/molluschicd/appendice.html

The idea is to bring together what malacologists, both amateur and professional alike can find on the Internet considering landsnails and slugs. Readers are welcome to send in ideas or url’s of websites that might be of interest to those who want to use this portal to the internet vast database on landsnails and slugs.ImageThis picture was made in the summer of 2012 and will give you an idea what malacology enthusiast is behind all this.

 

My name is Friedrich van der Wart (1959), I live in the Netherlands and became interested in molluscs in general and landsnails and fossils from the Eemian period in particular.

I published several papers on my discoveries in “de Kreukel”, a magazine of (in Dutch) 

Malacologische contactgroep De Kreukel, Amsterdam

For example I discovered new sites for the rare Helicodiscus (Hebetodiscus) singleyanis inermis (H.B. Baker, 1929). I found some pictures of it on this site

Welcome to WordPress.com! This is your very first post. Click the Edit link to modify or delete it, or start a new post. If you like, use this post to tell readers why you started this blog and what you plan to do with it.

Happy blogging!